The Current State of the European Union — at the eve of the Conference on the Future of Europe (full course)

Project number: 2050701

- Online Course -

Date & pricing

29/06/2020 - 03/07/2020
Register before: 25/06/2020

€ 850,00 per attendee

€ 765,00 for EIPA members*

The Current State of the European Union — at the eve of the Conference on the Future of Europe (full course)

From:  765,00

The primary objective of this online course is to explain the post-Lisbon regime, with a view to the just launched “Conference on the Future of Europe”, assess how the novelties introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon in various policy areas have proved themselves in practice and, finally, see what further modifications in institutional governance and the respective competencies are to be sought for to better equip the EU to respond to the current challenges.

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About this online course

The European Union is becoming an ever more complex entity that is difficult to grasp even for practitioners. At the same time, the European integration project has lately been facing distinct challenges that affect the core of the EU’s policy-making capacity as well as the political commitment of its Member States. The culmination of recent events creates dilemmas that go much further than traditional ‘deepening’ or ‘expanding’ integration paradigm and push the European Union to embody its mission more convincingly.

This summer school’s primary objective is to explain the post-Lisbon regime, with a view to the just launched “Conference on the Future of Europe”, assess how the novelties introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon in various policy areas have proved themselves in practice and, finally, see what further modifications in institutional governance and the respective competencies are to be sought for to better equip the EU to respond to the current challenges.

More specifically, the summer school will tackle how the institutional structure of the EU could be enhanced to better adhere to the democratic principle. In that regard, the possibilities of designing new electoral laws for the elections of the European Parliament will be discussed in detail as well as the right of initiative as the cornerstone of the current ordinary legislative procedure. Then, the course will elaborate further on how the EU could effectively safeguard the Rule of Law in its Member States, especially in cases of backslidings. Later, the modules will also address, inter alia,  how the EU could further ensure the protection of Fundamental Rights in the EU, how the EU is to preserve the Eurozone (and whether to expand it), how to make the European Union Greener and how to fight effectively against the climate crisis. Moreover, the course will also make a distinct effort to explain what digital transformation entails, what policies are regulatory areas are the most affected by that process and how the European values regarding social justice and equality can be maintained in the meantime. Finally, the course will map out how make the EU more secure and what role the EU should play on the world stage. On that basis the summer school will make an attempt to see what could the major issues for both EU Member States and EU institutions be in making an attempt to redesign the EU at the Conference on the Future of Europe.

Who this course is for:

Experts from national administrations and EU Institutions; practitioners from various EU-regulated policy fields; and lawyers, consultants, journalists and other professionals dealing with the European Union who want to enhance their understanding of how the recent developments in the EU will have an impact on their work.

Course methodology and highlights:

Sessions will be conducted by two experts providing a short presentation followed by facilitated panel discussions, allowing for the exchange of ideas and addressing issues of concern based on case studies, where participants will be especially encouraged to share their respective experiences.

What you will learn in this online course

The objective of the summer school is to provide national administrations, interest groups and practitioners affected by EU regulatory policy an enhanced understanding of how to work more effectively with the EU.

In essence, the course explores the tenets of the European Union and helps participants to understand the underlying political, social and economic dilemmas and evaluate European-level responses.

By the end of the course, you will:

  • understand what major events and policies shape the European Union today and how these events will have an impact on the institutional and legal identity of the EU of tomorrow.
  • understand the major political, legal, economical and asocial drives behind key EU policies
  • understand what the Conference on the Future of Europe is and what are the fundamental issues at stake

A 5-day course

The course consists of 10 modules:

Module I –Democratic and institutional aspects of the EU – Democratic institutions
As we would like you to gain maximum benefit from this course, irrespective of your level of knowledge on the European Union, we suggest that you enrol on the first module and take part in the thematic discussion of the “Conference on the Future of Europe”, and the democratic principle with a view to designing new rules for electing the Members of the European Parliament. Therefore, in this module, you will be introduced to the intrinsic nature of the EU, the motivations behind treaty modifications, the structure of the debate and the methodology of the Conference and eventually have  an in-depth discussions on the context of changing MEP electoral laws.

Module II – Democratic and institutional aspects of the EU – Democratic procedure
The second module focuses on how to make EU decision-making more democratic and what are the major items the “Conference on the Future of Europe” could discuss to further enhance the transparency and representative nature of the EU legislative processes. In this context a distinguished attention will be paid to the right of initiative – being, so far, the almost exclusive prerogative of the European Commission.

The module will map out the repercussions of equipping the European Parliament with the same right of initiative a specific demand made by the Parliament in preparation for the Conference.

Module III – European values – Rule of Law
The third module will provide an in-depth discussion of what is at stake when the principle of the Rule of law is under stress, what enormous risks Rule of Law backsliding really entails, what are the tools currently available for the EU to monitor its Member States and how it can intervene where there is a serious risk or persistent breach of Rule of Law in the latter. The session will also map out possible ways of strengthening the EU‘s repository of tools in stepping up for the defence of the Rule of Law and for the fundamental values of the EU.

Module IV –European values – Fundamental rights
The fourth module will elaborate on the current state of fundamental rights protection in the EU and how to improve the protection system. In that regards, the impact of the EU Charter and its direct enforceability on the Protection of Fundamental Rights will be assessed and the topic of the EU’s accession to the European Convention on Human rights will be specifically tackled.

Module V – EU priorities – Environmental challenge and climate crises
Climate crises and making the EU Greener is a top priority. The session will identify what are the key regulatory matters behind the Green deal, the circular economy (waste management), plastic reduction and biodiversity. The session will also discuss the EU’s climate targets and establish the link between environmental protection, combat against climate change and energy.

Module VI – EU priorities – Social justice and equality
In order to fully comprehend the drives behind social justice and equality the session will first introduce the main components and key concepts of an EU social policy, and then it will turn its attention specifically to the European “Pillar of Social Rights”.

Module VII – EU priorities – Economic governance
The seventh module concentrates on the discussion of the Eurozone. It asks the following questions:  how it has served the needs of the participating EU Member States and what are the immediate perspectives of this heightened form of integration.

Module VIII – EU priorities – Digital transformation
In the context of digital transformation, issues concerning EU data policy and artificial intelligence (AI) will be revisited. In this context, personal data protection, big data and ad data sharing will be specifically discussed. Corresponding EU policies will be identified with the view of what social-economic developments digital transformation and especially AI could entail.

Module IX – Security and the role of the EU in the world – Internal security
This module discusses the security issues which are currently present and shape home affairs cooperation among EU Member States. In this vain EU border security and solidarity in asylum policy will be specifically discussed as being key areas in which future consensus needs to be found to preserve the current intensity of the internal security cooperation among EU Member States.

Module X – The role of the EU in the world – External relations
The last module discusses the EU’s external actions. Discussions begin at the new powers granted to the EU by the Treaty of Lisbon and then specifically focus on the role of the European External Action Service, the EU’s external trade policy and, finally, the current stage of and lessons from Brexit. The session will complete the discussion of EU external action by mapping out the EU’s trade relations as well. Ideas will be conveyed as what ideas form the current and future role of the EU at the world stage.


The course is divided into shorter courses to offer you flexibility in adapting it to your needsIf you prefer to attend one of the shorter courses, kindly click on Future of Europe or EU Priorities or External Relations and Security.

If you are interested in attending only one or a few modules, kindly contact programme organiser Stéphanie Gemnig Comodi.

Igor Dizdarevic

Igor Dizdarevic

EU Law / EU Affairs

Petra Jeney

Petra Jeney

Freedom Security and Justice

Tomasz Kramer

Tomasz Kramer

EU Law / Internal Market

Wolfgang Koeth

Wolfgang Koeth

EU External Relations

Edward Best

Edward Best

EU Governance

Practical information

Online Course
For this online course we make use of Zoom

Programme Organiser
Ms Stéphanie Gemnig Comodi
Tel: +352 426 230 301
s.gemnig@eipa.eu

Discounts
EIPA offers a discount to all civil servants working for one of EIPA’s supporting countries, and civil servants working for an EU institution, body or agency.

Who are the supporting countries?
Civil servants coming from the following EIPA supporting countries are entitled to get the reduced fee: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

For all other participants, the regular fee applies.

Confirmation
Confirmation of registration will be forwarded to participants on receipt of the completed online registration form.

Payment
Prior payment is a condition for participation.

Cancellation policy
For administrative reasons you will be charged €50 for cancellations received after confirmation of your participation. There is no charge for qualified substitute participants.

EIPA reserves the right to cancel its live online activities up to 1 week before the starting date. In that case, registration fees received will be fully reimbursed

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The programme

Module I –Democratic and institutional aspects of the EU  – Democratic institutions
09.00 Democracy as the founding principle of the European Union
The session will lay out the frame of discussion, the legal and political EU treaty reform, the methodology of the Conference on the Future of Europe and the way forward to a new EU. It is in this vein that the session will specifically discuss the principle of democracy as it features among the founding values of the European Union and how that principle paved its way into concrete institutional and procedural solutions, such as the citizens initiative, the involvement of national parliaments. Specific emphasis will be made as to see how these instruments can be further mended to make the EU more democratic.Short presentation by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz facilitated by Igor Dizdarevic.
10.00 Discussion between Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz and the participants, moderated by Igor Dizdarevic.
10.30 Break
11.00 Democratic and institutional aspects of the EU:  EP elections
This session will explain how EP elections are currently held and will shed light onto the new discussion on redesigning the EP elections – a recurring theme in the debate on how to render EU institutions more democratic. The session will discuss in particular the lead candidate system [Spietzenkandidaten] and the transnational lists for European elections.
Short presentation by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz facilitated by Igor Dizdarevic.
12.00 Discussion between Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz and the participants, moderated by Igor Dizdarevic.
12.30 Break
Module II –Democratic and institutional aspects of the EU  – Democratic procedures
13.00 Democratic and institutional aspects of the EU:  The right of initiative
This session will start the discussion with the quintessential feature of EU policy cycle making that is the right of initiative which is an almost exclusive power of the European Commission. The session will explain how this right affects the entire EU policy cycle and how other actors/institutions, notably the European Parliament is keen to enjoy the same prerogative.
Short presentation by Edward Best facilitated by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz.
14.00 Discussion between Edward Best and  the participants, moderated by  Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz.
14.30 Break
15.00 Democratic and institutional aspects of the EUThe  legislative procedures
This session will review the ordinary and special legislative procedures as amended by the Lisbon Treaty and examine how the legislative bodies of the EU as well as the EU Member States’ national parliaments have made use of their respective powers. On that basis the session will identify issues that could feed into the discussion on how to make the legislative procedures more democratic and transparent.
Short presentation by Edward Best facilitated by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz.
16.00 Discussion between Edward Best and  the participants, moderated by  Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz.
16.30 End of Day 1
Module III –European values – Rule of Law
09.00 Democracy, rule of law and security, solidarity and trust
The session explains what the respect of rule of law entails in an EU context, explores what mechanisms are currently available for the EU to monitor and sanction Member States that fall short of this obligation. On this basis future possibilities to strengthen EU’s vigour in adherence to the principle will be discussed.
Short presentation by Igor Dizdarevic facilitated by Petra Jeney.
10.00 Discussion between Igor Dizdarevic and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney.
10.30 Break
11.00 Independence of the judiciary II.
The session specifically deals with judicial independence, a corner stone of the principle of rule of law and explains why this is of pivotal importance for the EU. Issues regarding judicial independence will also serve as a case study of a non-compliant Member State to demonstrate how rule of law issues lead to systemic deficiencies affecting the EU. This will enable participants to assess the EU institutions’ responses and draw lessons on how the rule of law tools available for the EU can be reinforced in the future
Short presentation by Petra Jeney facilitated by Igor Dizdarevic
12.00 Discussion between Petra Jeney and the participants, moderated by Igor Dizdarevic.
12.30 Break
Module IV –European values – Fundamental rights
14.00 The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights
This session will explain the legal nature and effect of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, its increasing direct enforceability, and how more and more rights in the Charter text are interpreted by the Court of Justice as having direct effect. The session will specifically tackle what impact the Charter has on the work of national judiciaries and how this imposes a further filter of legality on Member States when implementing EU law.
Short presentation by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz, facilitated by Petra Jeney.
Discussion between Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney
15.00 Break – Experts available for discussion
16.00

 

The EU and the European Convention on Human Rights
The session will identify why the accession of the EU to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) is marked as a legal imperative by the Lisbon Treaty. The role and status of the ECHR in EU law will be discussed, and an update on the recent developments concerning the EU’s accession to the ECHR will be provided. The session will illustrate with practical examples what the EU’s accession to the ECHR will entail for the national judiciaries.
Short presentation by Petra Jeney facilitated by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz,
Discussion between Petra Jeney and the participants, moderated by Juan Diego Ramírez-Cárdenas Díaz
16.30 End of Day 2
Module V – EU priorities – Environmental challenge and climate crises
09.00 Environmental challenges and the climate crisis I
This session will map out the current and future environmental challenges in the context of urgency of the climate change urgency. Particular focus will be given to the priorities of the current Commission, such as the Green Deal, the circular economy (waste management), plastic reduction and biodiversity.
Short presentation by Igor Dizdarevic
Discussion between Igor Dizdarevic and the participants
10.00 Break – Experts available for discussion
11.00 Environmental challenges and the climate crisis II
The second session will cover the EU’s climate related targets for 2030 and beyond, in particular in terms of emissions (the ETS system) and will also establish the link between environmental protection, combat against climate change and energy.
Short presentation by Igor Dizdarevic
Discussion between Igor Dizdarevic and the participants
12.00 Break – Experts available for discussion
Module VI – EU priorities – Social justice and equality
13.00 Social justice and equality
This session will introduce the main components and key concepts of an EU social policy, such as the fundamental principle of non-discrimination. The participants will also get a clear view of which competences the EU has to act in favor of social justice and equality of treatment, and which ones remain in the remit of the Member States.
Short presentation by Igor Dizdarevic, facilitated by Petra Jeney
Discussion between Igor Dizdarevic  and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney
14.00 Break – Experts available for discussion
15.00 Social justice and equality
The second session will explore the current (legislative) framework for social rights with concrete examples such as the parental leave directive or the recently revised posted workers directive. The European “Pillar of Social Rights” will also be examined.
Short presentation by Igor Dizdarevic, facilitated by Petra Jeney
Discussion between Igor Dizdarevic and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney
16.00 End of Day 3
Module VII – EU priorities – Economic governance
09.00 EU economic governance reform, Treaty reform
The session will explain and elaborate on the ‘Six-pack’ and ‘Two-pack’ and the European Fiscal Compact, a.k.a. the ‘Fiscal Stability Treaty,’ and the ultimate question whether the EU should move towards a genuine Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) encompassing fiscal union.
Arguments for and against the fiscal union will be discussed with a view on its impact on the Member States.
Short presentation by Dr Manfred Reinertz Barriera,  facilitated by Igor Dizdarevic
10.00 Discussion between Dr Manfred Reinertz Barriera and the participants, moderated by Igor Dizdarevic
10.30 Break
11.00 Banking Union
The session aims to explain what the Banking Union entails. Special reference will be made to the Single Supervisory Mechanism, the Single Resolution Mechanism and the complementary goal of attaining a Capital Markets Union and their respective impact on national authorities’ competences.
Short presentation by Dr Manfred Reinertz Barriera,  facilitated by Igor Dizdarevic
12.00 Discussion between Dr Manfred Reinertz Barriera and the participants, moderated by Igor Dizdarevic
12.30 Break
Module VIII – EU priorities – Digital transformation
13.00 Digital transformation – EU Data Policy
Data is at the centre of the digital transformation. It is expected that the volume of data produced annually in the world will grow from the 33 zettabytes of 2018 to 175 zettabytes in 2025. Europe has the opportunity to unlock all this potential to work for the economy and society. The new Commission considers data as one of the pillars of its new mandate, shaping a digital future that puts people first. This presentation will give an overview of the horizontal regulatory and policy frameworks for data, from data protection to data reuse. Building on the initiatives of the past mandate, it will introduce participants into the Commission’s plans to create a single market for data where more data becomes available while keeping companies and individuals who generate it in control.
Short presentation by Alberto Gago-Fernandez, facilitated by Tomasz Kramer 
14.00 Discussion between Alberto Gago-Fernandez and the participants, moderated by Tomasz Kramer
14.30 Break
15.00 Digital transformation – Artificial Intelligence
Artificial intelligence has become an area of strategic importance and a key driver of economic and societal development. However, socio-economic, legal and ethical impacts have to be carefully addressed. For example, safety and reliability of most of AI systems are dependent on wide availability of high-quality data. The presentation will give an account of the work of the Commission to stay at the forefront of this technological revolution, to ensure competitiveness and to shape the conditions for its development and use, in line with human rights and fundamental values. Short presentation by Alberto Gago-Fernandez, facilitated by Tomasz Kramer
16.30 Discussion between Alberto Gago-Fernandez and the participants, moderated by Tomasz Kramer
16.00 End of Day 4
Module IX – Security and the role of the EU in the world – Internal security
09.00 Border security Future of Schengen
The area with no internal border controls is the most palpable benefit of European integration. The session will explore how the migration crisis of 2015 has also jeopardised the Schengen Area and caused Member States to temporarily reinstate internal border controls. The session will provide an overview of the reforms so far made, such as the reinforcement of FRONTEX (the European Border and Coast Guard Agency), as well as the future steps that are needed to ensure border security and the continued existence of the Schengen Area.
Short presentation by Petra Jeney, facilitated by Clara Cotroneo
10.00 Discussion between Petra Jeney and the participants, moderated by Clara Cotroneo
10.30 Break
11.00 Reform of the Common European Asylum System
In 2015, Europe was shaken by the unanticipated exodus of people in need of international protection. The session will explain the events that triggered this unprecedented crisis and what impact this had in reshaping the Common European Asylum System on the basis of the current framework provided by the Treaty of Lisbon
Short presentation by Clara Cotroneo, facilitated by Petra Jeney
12.00 Discussion between Clara Cotroneo and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney
12.30 Break
Module X The role of the EU in the world – External relations
13.00 External security – Common Foreign and Security Policy
The Treaty of Lisbon reinforced the capacities of the EU in the field of external relations, inaugurating a series of news actors (European External Action Service) and improving instruments and mechanisms for the conduct of external affairs. The session will explore Member States’ perception of the new capacities and stakeholders carrying out their respective roles in the last decade and what that entails for the future.
Short presentation by Wolfgang Koeth, facilitated by Petra Jeney
14.00 Discussion between Wolfgang Koeth and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney
14.30 Break
15.00 External trade
The Treaty of Lisbon also reinforced and widened the scope of the European Union’s Common Commercial Policy. The session will take account how the improved powers of the EU to negotiate trade agreements have been used in practice and what role the EU plays in the WTO today.
Short presentation by Wolfgang Koeth, facilitated by Petra Jeney
15.30 Discussion between Wolfgang Koeth and the participants, moderated by Petra Jeney
16.00 End of the course